When you thought vinyls, cassettes, CD’s were the last tangible, material, corporeal formats in music and the nostalgia most people have for them, the death of the iPod Classic shows how even the first portable mp3-digital-music-device meant something very similar for music fans around the world (which at the same time, along with other devices, proves that music is not only about sounds but about these fetish formats and objects that went along with it).

Even when the mp3 format meant we’d no longer have ‘music’ as we knew it but music as information in a file instead, and this file was only presence in a virtual way in our PCs, iPods or other devices, we are getting nostalgic about the death of the iPod Classic. It’s like we feel sorry and sad because we lost what was already lost -a double lost-: first, we lost the experience when you could ‘touch’ music with your fingers: and now, we lost the carrier we had to play our intangible music.

Now the mp3 file is disappearing as well and streaming it’s making its way as the main channel to listen music and our nostalgia for music we could touch has become another commercial market field (just like vinyls are these days).

If we cared so much about music formats and devices we used to play our music, the questions we need to ask ourselves as music fans are: do we love music alone in the first place? Did we love it because of it? Was there something else in music we used to love? What is really what we loved then? What is really music?

All In Your Name (Part I)

"Madam Speaker, if there is a God — and I believe there is — and that God distributes grace and mercy and talent to all his children, on Aug. 29, 1958, he touched Gary, Ind.," said Jackson.

Jackson said the singer’s “heart couldn’t get any bigger,” adding: “I come to the floor today on behalf of a generation to thank God for living in his era.”

The moment, one day after death, was led by members of the Congressional Black Caucus. Reps. Diane Watson (D-Calif.) and Jesse Jackson Jr. (D-Ill.) spoke about Jackson before asking members to rise for a moment of silence.

Jun 26, 2009.

All In Your Name (Part II)

"Madam Speaker, if there is a God — and I believe there is — and that God distributes grace and mercy and talent to all his children, on Aug. 29, 1958, he touched Gary, Ind.," said Jackson.

Jackson said the singer’s “heart couldn’t get any bigger,” adding: “I come to the floor today on behalf of a generation to thank God for living in his era.”

The moment, one day after death, was led by members of the Congressional Black Caucus. Reps. Diane Watson (D-Calif.) and Jesse Jackson Jr. (D-Ill.) spoke about Jackson before asking members to rise for a moment of silence.

Jun 26, 2009.

Miley Cyrus

What’s wrong with fake by the way? and why is it fake?